7 Valentine's Day Poems For Your Husband That'll Make His Heart Go Pitter-Patter


Whether or not you're the type of person who normally expresses herself in verse, Valentine's Day has a way of bringing out the poetry in all of us. But even if you haven't yet mastered the art of writing an Elizabethan sonnet, or have completely forgotten what an iambic pentameter is, you can still share some Valentine's Day poems with your husband.

Because (luckily) love poetry isn't just for teenagers or newlyweds. We all know those initial fireworks are great, but there are plenty of poems out there that celebrate the strength and energy of married love instead. Poems that won't feel fake or forced if you want to share them with your husband.

So try writing one of these in his Valentine's Day card, or, if you're feeling brave, maybe even read it to him. You may not have given love poems much thought since your wedding day, but reading through a few of these might put you both in a romantic state of mind. (Or, at the very least, they might be a little more interesting than watching SVU reruns all night.)

So branch out beyond the old "Roses are red, violets are blue." These poems are sweet — just read them through!

"To My Dear and Loving Husband" By Anne Bradstreet


You know that feeling when everything between the two of you is just clicking? So did Anne Bradstreet, one of the early colonial settlers in Massachusetts. The passion of her love poem to her husband is not something we usually associate with the Puritans, but it still resonates today.

If ever two were one, then surely we.

If ever man were loved by wife, then thee.

If ever wife was happy in a man,

Compare with me, ye women, if you can.

I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold,

Or all the riches that the East doth hold.

"Touched By An Angel" By Maya Angelou

When you're married, love can feel pretty different from how it did when you were dating or engaged. Especially once you have kids. That breathless excitement might not be there, but it's been replaced by something deeper and truer. Maya Angelou's "Touched by an Angel" gets at that (sans any reference to the '90s TV show).

We are weaned from our timidity

In the flush of love's light

we dare be brave

And suddenly we see

that love costs all we are

and will ever be.

Yet it is only love

which sets us free.

"I Love You" By Ella Wheeler Wilcox

For something understated but sexy, try Ella Wheeler Wilcox's "I Love You." Wilcox started publishing her poetry in the 1880s and her work became very popular, according to the Poetry Foundation. It's not hard to see why:

So kiss me sweet with your warm wet mouth,

Still fragrant with ruby wine,

And say with a fervor born of the South

That your body and soul are mine.

Clasp me close in your warm young arms,

While the pale stars shine above,

And we’ll live our whole young lives away

In the joys of a living love.

"[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]" By E.E. Cummings


With its rhythmic pacing and sweet sentiments, there are good reasons that E.E. Cummings's "[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]" has become a classic. It's simple enough that it makes sense the first time you read it, but you'll also see new things if you reread it a few times. While it may have been avant-garde in the mid-twentieth century, according to the Poetry Foundation, today, its unusual spacing and lack of capitalization make it look almost like a text message.

here is the deepest secret nobody knows

(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud

and the sky of the sky of a tree called life;which grows

higher than soul can hope or mind can hide)

and this is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart

i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart)

“The Life That I Have” By Leo Marks

Leo Marks's “The Life That I Have” is a beautiful, simple poem that captures the permanence of love by using repetition: "Is yours and yours and yours." But there's a poignant story behind the poem, which Marks wrote in 1943 while working as a code breaker for Winston Churchill's Special Operations Executive, according to Huffpost. Marks's girlfriend had just died in a plane crash, and the poem was his way of “transmitt[ing] a message to her which I’d failed to deliver when I’d had the chance.”

Marks then went on to give the poem to Violette Szabo, an agent with the French resistance, to use as her personal cipher for encoding secret messages. Szabo was later compromised, and eventually tortured and killed by the Nazis — a story depicted in a 1958 film called Carve Her Name With Pride.

The life that I have

Is all that I have

And the life that I have 

Is yours

The love that I have 

Of the life that I have 

Is yours and yours and yours.

"The Good-Morrow" By John Donne

For a lot of people, the idea of love poetry immediately conjures up Shakesepeare's sonnets. But John Donne, one of the Bard's contemporaries, was also a prolific writer of love poems. In "The Good-Morrow," Donne describes a mature love that is content in itself, with the two partners making their "one little room an everywhere:"

And now good-morrow to our waking souls,

Which watch not one another out of fear;

For love all love of other sights controls,

And makes one little room an everywhere.

Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone;

Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown;

Let us possess one world; each hath one, and is one.

"Another Valentine" By Wendy Cope

Even if you thought you hated love poems, it turns out there's a love poem especially for you. "Another Valentine," a short poem written by Wendy Cope for The Daily Telegraph, starts out by expressing weariness for "yet another" Valentine's Day. But by the end the speaker has started to think it through and gotten into the spirit of the holiday:

Today we are obliged to be romantic

And think of yet another valentine.

We know the rules and we are both pedantic:

Today’s the day we have to be romantic.

Our love is old and sure, not new and frantic.

You know I’m yours and I know you are mine.

And saying that has made me feel romantic,

My dearest love, my darling valentine.

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