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11 Household Products That Aren't Safe For Babies, But You Still Keep Around

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It's amazing how quickly your cozy, comfortable home turns into a danger-filled house of horrors when you're a paranoid new parent. You suddenly realize how many pieces of furniture your baby can bonk their poor little head on, and how many things they can stick in their mouth. You may have already done your baby-proofing, but you can never underestimate how determined babies are to get into absolutely everything. There are probably a good number of household products that aren't safe for babies that you didn't think about yet.

You don't want to drive yourself crazy, but when it comes to your child's safety, you really can't be too careful. You've probably already got your harsher cleaning products like bleach locked up, but you may want to double check your home for these less obvious products. And don't forget that some of them can be brought in by visitors. I know my daughter loves to rummage through purses, and I always have to check to make sure she hasn't grabbed anything dangerous.

If your child does ever come into contact with any harmful substance, call Poison Control immediately at 1-800-222-1222, or call 911. But hoping that doesn't happen, here are 11 products to watch out for.

1Detergent Pods

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Whether they're for your washing machine or your dishwasher, chances are your detergent pods are colorful and bite-sized— pretty tempting to little mouths. The Wall Street Journal reported that thousands of babies and kids have been sickened by the pods, and some have even died.

2Button Batteries

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Tiny button batteries, like the kind often found in watches or in small electronic toys, can do serious damage if swallowed. The Poison Control center noted that button batteries can become stuck in a baby's esophagus and the chemicals inside them can also cause tissue damage.

3Vitamins

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Adults take vitamins to stay healthy, but the National Capital Poison Center noted that vitamins can be dangerous for babies. That's especially true of iron supplements, which can be deadly if kids get their hands on them.

4Beauty Products

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Pretty much every product in your beauty arsenal should be kept out of baby's reach. Consumer Reports noted that hundreds of kids are hospitalized every day after ingesting nail, hair, and skin products.

5Silica Beads

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You've seen these little packets in the box when you buy new shoes, or maybe when you pick up a new purse. "Do Not Eat" is right there on the label, but not because it's poisonous, according to Slate. They're more likely to be a choking hazard to babies.

6Magnets

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The American Academy of Pediatrics has warned parents to keep magnets out of babies' hands. Swallowing one can lead to perforated bowels and other major intestinal issues.

7Diaper Products

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If your baby is too young to crawl, you might think you've got a little time before you have to worry about any of this. But Poison Control noted that even the smallest babies can grab a tube of diaper cream set down near them during a change, which can be dangerous to ingest.

8Pet Products

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Does your baby have a furry sibling? Don't forget that any pet flea and tick shampoos you might have are pesticides, which can be very dangerous if swallowed, as noted by the March of Dimes.

9Plants

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If you have plants in your home or in your background, make sure you know whether they're poisonous. Kids Health noted that plants like lily of the valley, holly, and mistletoe are toxic if ingested.

10Mothballs

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If you're using mothballs in your closet or basement to keep clothes from getting moldy, make sure to keep baby away. The State of Connecticut warned that if a baby swallows a mothball, they could become extremely sick.

11Medications

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Most medications these days will come in containers that are supposed to be child-proof, which may make you a little less worried about them. But Safe Kids reminded parents that a determined little one might still be able to crack one open, so don't slack on storing them safely out of reach.