To a child, books are more than just educational, they're an entryway to the imagination. They spark deep questions,teach them about the world around them and show them how to dream big. Books should be an integral part of any child's life, but what about when you grow up and aren't expected to read anymore? Are adults expected to stick to reading tabloids, romance novels and the newspaper? Not as far as I'm concerned. I'm a firm believer in finding children's books that adults can relate to. Because honestly, I think they're a lot more fun to read than most "adult literature" these days.

The great thing about children's books is that you don't have to be an English major or even an avid reader to fall in love with these stories. They have simple plot lines that usually give way to much deeper meanings. Even if you're not up for analyzing the intentions and messages within the story, they're usually quite entertaining as it is. A little bit of child-like wonder is healthy for every adult, so grab a cup of coffee, cozy up in your favorite spot and get ready to channel your inner child with these classic reads.

1. 'Anne Of Green Gables' by L.M. Montgomery

Spunky, rebellious, and lovable, Anne Of Green Gables is an absolute must-read. Even if you've already read it. The story of an orphan girl who goes to live with an elderly couple who meant to adopt a boy. Anne of Green Gables (and the entire series) is a beautiful coming of age story with plenty of twists along the way.

2. 'Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone' by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone is perfect for readers of all ages. With themes that adults can relate to, characters you instantly come to love and a plot line that will turn the pages for you, it's no wonder the Harry Potter series is one of the most popular in the world.

3. 'The Little Prince' by Antoine De Saint-Exupery

Saint-Exupery himself believed The Little Prince to be a "children's book written for grown-ups." It's told from an adult's perpective, an aviator who crashes his plane and meets a small prince from asteroid B-612. The story has hidden meanings and so much food for thought that make it the perfect read for adults.

4. 'The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe' by C.S. Lewis

The first book in a classic series by C.S. Lewis, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe is about four siblings who discover a magical world inside of an old wardrobe. It will stretch your imagination, ask you deep questions and make you fall in love with the Pevencie children.

5. 'Harriet The Spy' by Louise Fitzhugh

Harriet the Spy is the story of a quirky 11 year old aspiring writer with an afternoon "spy route." It's a classic worth reading no matter your age.

6. 'Alice's Adventures In Wonderland' by Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll's mind boggling work stands alone as one of the most imaginative and compelling stories of it's time. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is both whimsical and relatable; silly and thought provoking, all at the same time.

7. 'Charlotte's Web' by E.B. White

Charlotte's Web is the sweet story of a relationship between a spider named Charlotte and a pig named Wilbur. It's a tear-jerkingly beautiful tribute to sacrifice and friendship.

8. 'A Series Of Unfortunate Events' by Lemony Snicket

All of the books in the Series of Unfortunate Events books are a must-read if you like dark, imaginative stories. Follow along as orphaned siblings go to live with a caretaker who isn't fit to watch them. Adventure and, of course, lots of unfortunate events, ensue in this page turner.

9. 'A Wrinkle In Time' by Madeleine L'Engle

One of my personal favorites, A Wrinkle In Time goes much deeper than the surface level plot line. In the story, Meg Murry, her younger brother Charles Wallace, and their friend Calvin O'Keefe, are sent on an adventure through time to rescue her father from evil forces holding him captive.

10. 'Where The Wild Things Are' by Maurice Sendak

Another surreal classic, Where the Wild Things Are is the story of Max, a young boy who feel misunderstood at home and escapes to the land of the wild things. He becomes their king and has countless adventures, only to realize he misses home and makes it back in time for dinner.

11. 'Love You Forever' by Robert Munsch

I know, Love You Forever isn't exactly a difficult read, but I dare you to read the words "I'll love you forever, I'll like you for always" as a parent and not bawl like a baby.

12. 'The Giving Tree' by Shel Silverstein

Really, any Shel Silverstein work is worth your time. But The Giving Tree stands out as one of the most popular. It's about a tree and the little boy she loved— it doesn't get more heartwarming than that.

13. 'The Story Of Ferdinand' by Munro Leaf

The Story of Ferdinand, is about a sweet bull who would much rather sit and smell the flowers than fight with the other bulls. It is much more than just a sweet story, however. It was actually banned by Hitler, as it encourages children (through its mere 800 words and illustrations) to think for themselves and go against the crowd.