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Can I Have Anal Sex After Having A Baby? You May Want To Wait

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After birth, it's fairly common for your doctor to advise waiting six weeks postpartum before having sex again. Then, at what's generally your first check up after birth, you can start the conversation about intercourse. This conversation, however, doesn't necessarily address the topic of anal sex, leading some to wonder "can I have anal sex after having a baby," or is it better to put that on hold as well?

According to a Baby Center article written by OB-GYN Laura Fijolek McKain, it is best to hold off on anal sex following delivery. If you've had an episiotomy or vaginal laceration repair, you want to be sure you're completely healed, as anal sex could still affect any stitches you may have.

Much like vaginal intercourse, McKain said it's a good idea to wait until your doctor does your post-birth examination to attempt anal sex. According to Baby Med, avoiding anal sex (or any type of intercourse) helps prevent infection as well. Although some women would be OK to have anal intercourse before reaching the end of the six week wait, it's still a good safety precaution to abide by until you've officially been cleared.

In the aforementioned Baby Center article, McKain also mentioned that many women suffer from hemorrhoids after giving birth. This can cause anal sex to be very painful and potentially create heavy bleeding as well. So, in general, it's a good idea to avoid anal sex for many of the same reasons you'd avoid vaginal intercourse with the addition of potential hemorrhoid complications.

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Although the blanket statement of refraining from intercourse for six weeks after birth may seem pretty straightforward, it applies to more than just vaginal intercourse. The previously mentioned Baby Med article stated that when obstetricians say no sex for six weeks, it means to avoid penetration into the vagina and rectum. Penetration doesn't strictly refer to a penis either; it also includes fingers, dildos, vibrators, and anything else as well. For your own safety, it may be best to avoid any and all sex until the doctor gives you the OK.