Confetti-Filled Party Popteenies Might Just Be Your Child's Newest Obsession, So Brace Yourself

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If, like me, you have a child who has fallen inexplicably in love with watching YouTubers unboxing blind bags and surprise toys, then it's possible you will soon also have a child begging you for a slightly startling surprise popper. In fact, these confetti-filled Party Popteenies might just be your child's newest obsession, and honestly, it's easy to see why. Party Popteenies pretty much combine tiny collectable dolls, confetti, and the element of surprise to offer up a party-themed toy kids will love — think, New Year's Eve confetti poppers filled with hidden surprises that you don't have to wait until midnight to enjoy.

Spin Master announced the launch of Party Popteenies Monday, and while there are already a few YouTube videos available from excited kids showing off how the new toys work, the company has also released an actual music video to celebrate their newest product, which features YouTube stars Heaven King and Piper Rockelle dancing to an original, party-themed song, "Everyone's Invited." In other words? Party Popteenies checks all the boxes for kids who already can't get enough of blind pack toys and YouTube dance videos, which basically means I already know what I'll end up buying all of my daughter's friends when their birthday parties roll around.

There are four different versions of Party Popteenies available: the individual, single-use surprise popper comes in three different themes, or "party squads" — Rainbow Unicorn, Cutie Animal or Winter Wonderland — along with surprise "hair and party accessories" hidden in the base of the popper, while the double surprise popper offers one Popteenie doll and a pet animal, as well as "themed stickers and chip décor." Party Popteenies are also available in a pack of six for added fun, and if that weren't enough, there's also the Poptastic Party Playset — complete with "a spinning dance floor, photo booth, banquet room, and a swanky elevator" — and the Rainbow Unicorn Party Surprise Box Playset, which creates a full tiny party scene with stickers and accessories.

Party Popteenies are recommended for kids ages 4 and up, and all in all, there are over 25 Popteenie dolls to collect. Eight Popteenie characters can be found on the toy's website, each of whom has a name and an identity (Bella, for example is a pink-haired "planner" who thinks "kindness is always on trend," while Ava is a brunette "chef" who loves "to bring people together with good food").

BananasMom on YouTube

Judging by some of the YouTube unboxing videos, Party Popteenies appear a little bit difficult to figure out at first, and honestly, they kind of remind me of opening up a can of Pillsbury dough. But they definitely seem to be a big hit: one reviewer, on the channel BananasMom, looked delightfully shocked once she figured out how to make the Popteenie pop, before screaming, "that was epic!" and "that's the best." And the commenters seemed to be totally here for it, too. One wrote, "Wow, that really pops ... I love how it really caught you by surprise," while another said, "I need these in my life! So hope these come to stores soon. Such a fun concept."

That commenter is in luck: Party Popteenies can now be purchased from Amazon, Walmart, and Target, where they retail for $4.99 to $24.99 depending on the set. If you have little ones around though, you'll want to be extra careful — because of the small parts, Walmart notes that Party Popteenies present a choking hazard for children under 3.

Although I'm certain my daughter will love Party Popteenies, the fact that they explode with confetti means that I won't exactly be in any rush to go out and buy her one. At the same time, blind bag surprise toys have already infiltrated our lives (looking at you, LOL Surprise! dolls), and while I'm not thrilled about it, they do seem to bring her and her friends an inordinate amount of joy. So messiness and mini-pop-heart-attack aside, I'm going to guess it'll only be a matter of time before Party Popteenies make their "please Mom?" radars.