CVS Removed Enfamil Baby Formula From Its Stores Nationwide — Here’s What Parents Need To Know

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Following up on a mom's concerns over powdered baby formula she purchased, CVS has removed Enfamil baby formula from its stores nationwide due to suspected product tampering, ABC Action News reported. CVS launched its investigation into the formula following ABC Actions News' report about a mom in Florida who alleged that she found baking flour in a tub of Enfamil she purchased from a local CVS.

CVS and Enfamil did not immediately respond to Romper’s requests for comment.

Sadly, it's not uncommon for people to tamper with baby formula products. In May 2017, for instance, a woman in Tucson, Arizona, was arrested for allegedly tampering with multiple baby formula containers throughout the city, according to NBC26. The woman reportedly bought and filled the purchased containers with other substances, and then she returned the tampered goods at retail chains in exchange for cash, according to Tucson.com.

Given the recent events in Tucson concerning baby formula, Florida mom Alison Denning was on high alert when she noticed something amiss with her recently purchased Enfamil formula from CVS. Although a protective seal on the package's lid was intact, an interior seal appeared tampered with, as ABC Action News reported. Making matters even more suspicious? Denning believes the formula smelt like baking flour, according to USA Today.

Concerned about the formula, Denning went to another CVS and bought the same tub of Enfamil for comparison, telling ABC Action News about the second container: "This one is a little bit more grainy, it’s a little harder to pack, it has a slightly yellow color to it."

ABC Action News on YouTube

Luckily, CVS and Enfamil took Denning's concerns very seriously. CVS said in a statement about the issue, according to WSB-TV Atlanta:

The health and safety of our customers is our highest priority and we have robust quality assurance policies and procedures in place to ensure the quality and safety of the products we sell. We take our customer’s report of suspected tampering of Enfamil purchased at our Oldsmar store seriously. We will be contacting the supplier, and as a matter of precaution we have removed all Enfamil products from this store pending the outcome of our investigation.

Enfamil assured consumers this suspected tampering appears to be an "isolated" incident, and that "there have been no other reports of flour for this particular batch of formula," according to Alabama Local News.

It's also important to note CVS hasn't recalled Enfamil formula. A 10News journalist, Liz Crawford, shared the following clarification from CVS on Twitter:

There is no recall, but Enfamil powder is temporarily unavailable in our stores this week due to an internal review being conducted by CVS Pharmacy... We have not identified any problems in any other markets outside of Tampa, FL. We expect to resume the sale of these products shortly.

It's great to hear CVS and Enfamil are taking this issue seriously considering baking flour used as formula can make children extremely sick. In fact, a child was hospitalized in May 2017 for an illness related to suspected formula tampering, as NBC26 reported. Denning echoed this sentiment in a statement to ABC Action News, saying:

I encourage anyone who is at a point desperate enough to switch formula to seek alternate ways than to either steal it and replace it because it’s not only immoral but it’s also dangerous for another child.

Going forward, it's important that parents continue to be vigilant about their baby's formula. Be sure to thoroughly inspect packaging for any broken seals, and report any suspected tampering. Additionally, note the consistency and smell of the formula before you feed it to your child. If it seems different than your usual formula, alert the store or company you bought it from ASAP.

Although this alleged incident is an unfortunate one, it's an important reminder for parents to trust their instincts. Denning did the right thing by contacting CVS and Enfamil about this issue, and it's a relief to know her child didn't drink the formula in question.