Do You Queef More After Having A Baby? It's Not A Welcomed Postpartum Change

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Whether you’re on your first child or fourth, postpartum bodies can be truly confusing. There are a number of changes that, while not usually permanent, are completely out of your control for days, weeks, and sometimes even months after having a baby. Many of the new occurrences generally involve your pelvic floor and the inability to control really anything down there for a while. And one of the things that may be occurring more often, in correlation with weaker muscle control, is queefing. So, do you queef more after having a baby? And, if so, you might also be wondering if there’s a way to make it stop.

First, it’s important to define what queef actually is. In an interview with Women’s Health, clinic professor Dr. Mary Jane Minkin said it’s a totally normal occurrence that happens when a trapped pocket of air getting forced out of the vagina. But just how does that air get there? According to She Knows, gas can escape from the rectum and slide into the vagina. Again, it's normal but not necessarily enjoyable, especially when you're already super conscious about your postpartum changes.

Luckily, pelvic floor exercises can help if the organs in the pelvic floor are prolapsing and you feel there's less control, whether it be in the form of urinating, queefing, or strength in general.

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The aforementioned Women's Health article noted that queefing often occurs during sex. Because the penis is going in and out of the vagina, it can displace the air inside of it. Queefing more after giving birth could very easily occur because muscle strength or general control could be lacking, which is normal for any mom postpartum.

In order to try to cope with the lack of muscle strength within the pelvic floor, Baby Centre suggested that pelvic floor exercises will help your perineum and vagina heal better — maybe even quicker. Additionally, taking into consideration that birth weakens the pelvic floor in general, working to strengthen can only help several potential struggles, including queefing more after baby. If you continue to struggle or be concerned, you should consult your healthcare provider for extra help.