How Far Back Should A Child Be From A Firework? It's Better To Be Safe Than Sorry


You're out of the baby stage. You're (finally) out of the toddler stage. Your kid is now a semi-independently functioning human being capable of at least base level of reason and common sense. It's (Can you hear Jasmine singing?) a whole new world. So obviously, you're pretty stoked about the potential for more fun and less stress this 4th of July. But if you're like many parents, you're still wondering things like, "how far back should a child be from a firework?" and you know the answer is important.

According to Bruce Zolden, CEO of fireworks retailer Phantom Fireworks, fireworks are great family fun, but are not intended to be used equally by all family members. In an exclusive interview, Zolden tells Romper that his company specifically states that children are never under any circumstances to handle fireworks. In fact, Phantom's recommendations are that children keep a clear radius of 30 feet for fountains and other ground-based items, and a whopping 140 feet for any aerial product.

Sound extreme? Consider this: according to information given to Romper from the Burn Center for Children in Philadelphia's Saint Christopher's Hospital, medical centers nationwide treat an average of 230 people per day for fireworks-related injuries in the weeks surrounding the 4th of July. Your child shouldn't be among those numbers.

In addition to keeping kids at least 140 feet from aerial fireworks, there are several other safety measures to keep in mind on the 4th of July, says Dr. Carlos Jimenez of the University of Texas Medical Branch. In an interview with Romper, Jimenez proposes six safety tips for parents to abide by: buy fireworks only from a licensed dealer, only use fireworks in a clear outdoor area, wear safety glasses, light only one firework at a time, have a bucket of water or hose nearby, and never experiment with homemade fireworks.

When you have children, the safest way to enjoy fireworks is always to go to a community display. Not only will you be sitting far enough away to not have to worry about burns or hearing loss, you're also free to kick your feet up, relax, and have an extra drink. Listen to the experts — children and fireworks shouldn't be too close.