How Having Pregnancy Sex Affects Your Pregnancy: The Good, The Bad, & The Awkward

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Once you get over the initial shock of pregnancy (and resign yourself to a few months without sushi), another concern creeps to mind. What about sex? Knowing how having pregnancy sex affects your pregnancy is crucial for all moms-to-be.

If your pregnancy is progressing without any complications, then sex is unlikely to affect your developing baby at all. As explained by the Mayo Clinic, amniotic fluid and strong uterine muscles protect your baby, so sex is not going to affect your pregnancy one way or another. That said, if you and your SO are into the harder stuff, you may want to take a few precautions to safely have rough intercourse during pregnancy, as noted on Romper. But for the most part, the majority of sexual acts, and even a little light bondage, are OK.

If you are experiencing complications with your pregnancy, however, then it's best to take your sex life on a case-by-case basis. If you have a history of multiple miscarriages, incompetent cervix, or placenta previa, then sex during pregnancy may not be safe, according to WebMD. Even if you don't have these conditions, it's smart to have a conversation with your physician about potential pregnancy complications from sex. If you have any concerns about pregnancy sex, don't hesitate to discuss them with your doctor.

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On the flip side, however, your pregnancy will almost certainly affect your sex life. For what it's worth, a wide range of variations are considered perfectly normal. Some women experience a much heightened libido, perhaps due in part to those pregnancy hormones, as noted in What To Expect. Many other women, however, feel like they're in more of a "No, thank you," phase. With this in mind, not wanting sex during pregnancy is also very common, as noted by Very Well. You current trimester, experiences with morning sickness, and overall mood can also play into your libido.

Basically? Pregnancy sex is a different experience for everyone. But as long as you aren't coping with any serious pregnancy complications, you and your partner are free to have as much (or as little) sex as you please.