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How To Make Sex Less Painful, Because It Should Be Pleasurable

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Sometimes bad sex happens to good people. This is super frustrating when a partner is doing everything right, but the efforts result in nothing but chafing and discomfort. In these instances, knowing how to make sex less painful is crucial. After all, sex should be one thing that feels pleasant in life.

Before you can learn how to make sex less painful, you need to know what causes painful intercourse. According to WebMD, a lack of lubrication is one of the most common reasons women experience painful sex, which makes sense. Without enough slip down there, the resulting friction is unpleasant. Additionally, hormonal changes, medications, and even anxiety can contribute to vaginal dryness, according to Everyday Health. Is there a conspiracy to make everything parched below the belt?

That said, there are many ways to increase vaginal lubrication for more comfortable sex. The first, and most pleasant, remedy is to add lots of foreplay. According to the website for Shape, about 20 minutes of foreplay gives the body time to lubricate, making the main act much easier. Additionally, foreplay is different for everyone. A long kissing session might work, or the addition of a toy or two. Get imaginative and explore the options to find what works.

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In some cases, however, even hours of foreplay will not result in enough lubrication. Certain medications or health conditions dry things out down there. If this sounds familiar, then dive in to the wonderful world of lube. If the typical drugstore stuff is not a favorite, then trying an all-natural lube could be the ticket, as noted by Bustle. Many of them rely on plant-based ingredients to provide maximum slip without any petrochemicals or parabens. Oh, and lube technology has improved in recent years, so many are safe for sensitive skin. The resulting sex is almost guaranteed to be pain-free, fantastic, and slippery.

If these tips do not help, or the pain is severe, then it may be time to see a doctor. According to the Cleveland Clinic, anything from vaginismus to endometriosis could lead to more seriously painful intercourse. In these cases, a physician's guidance is invaluable.