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How To Send Free Thank You Cards To Frontline Workers Right Now

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If you and your family are looking for a way to give back to those who are working to keep the world running amid the coronavirus pandemic, Unilever has made it easy to send free thank you cards to frontline workers and spread a little joy during these difficult times.

Through Unilever's United for America campaign, you can send letters of gratitude to the 11,000+ essential Feeding America food bank employees and volunteers across the country. Throughout the pandemic, food insecurity has been a pressing concern; according to Feeding America, the coronavirus outbreak could cause the number of food-insecure individuals to rise to as many as 17.1 million. What's more, nearly one in five households with children aged 12 or younger have been experiencing food insecurity during the pandemic, according to research from the Brookings Institution's Hamilton Project.

Needless to say, the work of those providing food and necessary supplies to millions of Americans in need is invaluable right now and sending a heartfelt card is a lovely way to let your children give back. And in times like these, finding a way to keep kids meaningfully engaged is no small feat. And, hey, by helping little ones craft a thank you letter, parents can also show kids the power of thankfulness and consideration for others.

To send a free thank you card, simply visit this link on Postable and get started.

With a variety of card options — including fun plays on words like "Thank You for BEAN There" and banana cards that read "Thanks a Bunch!" — you and your kids can simply choose the format that's most appealing. From there, you select which Feeding America food bank you wish to send your card to, write a personalized message to the recipient, and provide your return address. The shipping fees are waived as a part of initiative, so mailing the cards is free and easy. Include an email address to receive confirmation and your card will be on its way in no time.

While looking to fill the long, school-free days with kids at home, consider writing out a few thoughtful greeting cards with your little ones.

If you think you’re showing symptoms of coronavirus, which include fever, shortness of breath, and cough, call your doctor before going to get tested. If you’re anxious about the virus’s spread in your community, visit the CDC for up-to-date information and resources, or seek out mental health support. You can find all of Romper’s parents + coronavirus coverage here, and Bustle’s constantly updated, general “what to know about coronavirus” here.