Is Bondage Safe For Pregnant Women? Some Things to Consider Before Busting Out The Handcuffs

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Just because you're pregnant doesn't mean you can't act on your sexual fantasies. In fact, many woman feel more turned on while pregnant thanks to raging hormones. It's widely known that sex is generally safe during pregnancy for women who don't have any existing complications. But what about sex that doesn't get much mainstream attention? What about bondage? It's considered a taboo topic because of the current culture's attitudes toward sex, but it's important to talk about. Many who practice it (or want to in the future) may wonder, is bondage safe for pregnant women?

As it turns out, it's totally safe but with just a few extra considerations. "Generally, the standard rules for exercise will apply to bondage practices," Lamaze certified childbirth educator Deena Blumenfeld of Shining Light Prenatal Education, tells Romper. She explains that "pregnant women should not be lying on their bellies, nor lying on their backs for extended periods after the first trimester or so." She added that twists through the lower abdomen might be kind of uncomfortable, so be aware of that. The main thing to consider when practicing bondage is to make sure blood flow is not restricted to the mom's belly. She says most bondage will likely involve hands, feet, or gags, which means overall bondage is not an issue during pregnancy.

If you've tried some bondage play pre-pregnancy, but are feeling like certain positions are uncomfortable now (not in a fun, good, or pleasurable way), modifications can always be made. According to What To Expect, staying in one position for too long might not be a good idea because it can make you uncomfortable. The recommendation is that partners practicing bondage play should do so in a way that allows free movement of the pregnant person. Most importantly, the pregnant partner needs to be able to speak up. Again, this may require some modifications to your bondage play like taking a break from muzzling or maybe switching out snug hand cuffs for more loose-fitting silk ropes (if cuffs are too tight because of swelling).

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Beyond making adjustments, there's also the type of bondage play you definitely want to stay away from while pregnant. "Bondage that involves electrical play or nipple clamps or more intense sexual play, should be postponed until you are not pregnant," Dr. Sherry A. Ross, author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women's Intimate Health. Period tells Romper. "With all the hormonal and physical changes during pregnancy the body including all the erogenous zones can be more sensitive and not in a good way."

No matter what you've practiced before sexually (or are currently experimenting with), the most important thing is: you have to be able to talk about it. "As with any bondage play, if the woman is the sub, she needs to have clear communication with her partner(s) and have appropriate ways to indicate she is no longer comfortable with what is going on," Blumenfeld says. Part of that communication is having a safe word established before the sex or bondage takes place.

Pregnancy changes things in all aspects of someone's life, even sex. Having a bump doesn't mean you can't bump like you want to. It just means you have to listen to your body, and not judge if it's sending you a different message than your pre-pregnancy body. Staying engaged with your body and being honest with your partner(s), will ensure that sex is safe for you and baby.