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Is The Nintendo SNES Appropriate For Kids Under 5? It's The Latest Must-Have Console


In the wake of last year's highly successful release of the NES Classic Edition, Nintendo has announced the release of the SNES Classic Edition, coming this September. In the midst of the SNES hype, parents may be left wondering, is the Nintendo SNES appropriate for kids under the age of 5? Judging by the games included in the package, the answer is yes, for the most part.

The SNES is essentially a miniature version of the classic Super Nintendo. At the low price of $80, the SNES comes complete with with two wired controllers, one USB charging cable and adapter, one HDMI cord, and 21 original Nintendo games, such as "Super Mario Kart" and "Donkey Kong Country."

For the ease of parents everywhere, The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) has given every video game on the market a rating of age appropriateness. Of the games included in the SNES package, many, such as "Donkey Kong Country," are rated E, for everyone. But some of the games, such as "Contra III: The Alien Wars" are rated E 10+, for everyone age 10 and older.

While the system itself and many of the games included with the SNES may be completely fine for young children, some of the included games may be deemed inappropriate by certain parents. Romper has reached out to Nintendo US for comment and is awaiting a response.

Mom and video game writer Ellie Gibson discussed the topic of children and video games in a post for The Guardian. While she is a video game enthusiast herself, she does have regulations in her home when it comes to her children and their play time:

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Nostalgia-inducing reproductions of childhood favorites, such as the Nintendo SNES, are a great opportunity for parents to share memories from their own childhoods with their children and encourage family play time. The Child Development Institute reports that children and parents playing together is an important part of childhood development. Playing any type of game, even video games, helps children learn about winning and losing, taking turns, and following basic rules.

The SNES may be the perfect vessel for family bonding and allow parents to impress their little ones with a display of mad "Zelda" skills. Just be sure to check the individual game ratings before sharing them with younger children.