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Photos Of The Trump Protests Show How Divisive The Election Really Was

When the election results rolled in Tuesday night and into early Wednesday morning, people could not believe what was happening. A man that had for months represented so much hate and and divisiveness, Donald Trump, was chosen to become the 45th president of the United States of America — and that end result didn't even represent the popular vote. On Wednesday night, voters took out to the streets in opposition and photos of the Trump protests show just how unrepresented thousands of people feel at this very moment.

According to CNN, on Wednesday night, anti-Trump protests broke out in at least seven cities in the United States on both coasts. In New York City, thousands of protestors took to incredibly busy and heavily trafficked streets, walking 40 blocks from Union Square to Trump Tower, where they stood together in solidarity against Trump being elected president. It wasn't just New York City protesting peacefully on Wednesday night either: Protestors in cities such as Chicago, Illinois; Boston, Massachusetts; Austin, Texas; and Seattle, Washington, among others, followed those marching in New York City, walking in the streets and chanting in opposition of Trump becoming the president.

Photos from these events all across the nation all have one major thing in common — that people are not happy with the possibility of a four year, Trump presidency, which could very likely hurt minorities, the LGBTQ community, the disabled, and women in general:

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According to CNN, protestors shouted things such as "Not my president, not today," to distance themselves even further from Trump, his potentially threatening policies, and decisions he might make in the White House. In Washington, D.C. protestors held a candlelight vigil, according to CNN, to "mourn the loss of the election."

Earlier on Wednesday in California high schools, according to The Los Angeles Times, high school students staged a "walk out," leaving their high school classrooms and walking into the streets in opposition of the election's results. Even though many could more than likely not vote in this election, high school students are old enough to know the consequences of a Trump presidency — especially those who are minority or LGBTQ. Their opposition proves that they're not willing to go down without a fight — despite what the electoral vote may determine.

People on all coasts can agree — they're not happy about the results and now is the time to come together in solidarity to say something, even if it only means making themselves known to the incoming president, before he shapes his official agenda.