I can only imagine how it feels to become a parent for the first time. The words thrilling, exciting, nerve-racking, and love, all immediately come to mind. I'm sure that's close to what South African dads Christo and Theo Menelaou felt – perhaps multiplied three times over – when they brought home their adorable triplet babies for the first time. Of course, triplets and newborns alone are enough to prompt a flurry of excitement. But there's another reason Christo and Theo had to be especially excited: the couple's triplets carried DNA from both of their same-sex parents — reportedly the first ever multiples with DNA from three parents, according to the International Business Times.

Of course, the couple went through a long journey to become parents. In an interview with Sky News, Christo Menlaou shared some of the couple's previous experiences in pursuing adoption:

When you are gay, there is always the thought that it just may not be possible to be a parent no matter how much you would love to be. It's very hard to be accepted for adoption and we were told we would always come after heterosexual couples. And then we just never thought we'd ever find a person who would want to be surrogate to a gay couple.

The Menalaous have two girls, Zoe and Kate, and a boy, Joshua, by a surrogate. Both dads reportedly used their sperm to fertilize one embryo each, and 10 weeks into the pregnancy revealed that one embryo had split – resulting in triplets, two of which are identical (Zoe and Kate) according to the Sky News interview with the dads. The triplets share both fathers' DNA, the Associated Press reported.

The babies were delivered, prematurely, in July. And the adorable triplets are now home with their dads, after weeks of being monitored in the hospital, Sky News reported. The babies reportedly needed breathing assistance, and are still receiving care from nurses at home.

The gynecologist who delivered the triplets said the babies, born by surrogate with a split embryo resulting in triplets, was an "extremely rare" situation. "It is extremely rare," Dr Heidra Dahms told Sky News. "I have never heard of this before."

According to Adele Van Der Walt Inc., a medical-related specialist law firm in Pretoria, South Africa, the country's expanded Children’s Act 38 of 2005, Chapter 19, helped make it a reality for same-sex parents to legally have children by surrogacy in 2010.

Theo and Christo's excitement can be easily seen in the video segment captured by the Associated Press. It's clear that Zoe, Katie, and Joshua are already little fighters. "We feel so blessed, We really do," Theo told Sky News.

Congrats to the new parents!