What Does It Mean If You Don't Feel Horny During Ovulation? Here's The Deal

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Sometimes it feels like your cycle is less "predictable day to day" and more "rollercoaster," with each day bringing a new and unexpected happening. You may want to climb your partner on your period, and then you definitely don't feel like touching them. But what does it mean if you don't feel horny during ovulation? Does it affect your fertility?

According to a 2013 study published in Hormones and Behavior, the majority of women experience a peak in sexual hunger and arousal mid-cycle. Thought to be an evolutionary imperative, the desire for sex on and around ovulation, as well as the physiological manifestations like swollen breasts and a more symmetrical face, supposedly not only make you more attractive to the opposite sex, but also more willing to engage in sexual activity, thus continuing to populate the world via your hotness. In fact, it's not just the opposite sex that finds you more attractive. According to Glamour magazine, women noted having an improved body image during ovulation, feeling sexier than at any other point during their cycle. So break out the Barry Manilow (or whoever turns your crank, personally, I like "Copacabana") and oysters, because you are here to party.

This sexy feeling manifests not just in your behavior around possible mates, noted Psychology Today, but also in how you treat yourself. The article cited a study that linked increased frequency of masturbation around the time of ovulation, and theorized that both women without mates and mated pairs will seek sexual stimulation during that period via any means necessary.

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But that's obviously not the case for every woman. What does it mean if you don't feel horny during ovulation? Is something amiss?

The same study I noted earlier that concluded most women feel horniest during mid-cycle, also noted that while it is the case for the majority of people, that doesn't mean that the opposite isn't normal. The study found that women simply react to the ovulation hormones, specifically progesterone differently. Some women are less affected by this hormone or even oppositely affected, making them less hungry for sex and aroused than they are throughout the rest of the cycle.

Another factor may be that some women, specifically those with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), might have physical problems that arise during ovulation, like bloating and headaches that dull the libido, according to Johns Hopkins. Also, women with PCOS may not ovulate at all, which would be an alternative reason they're just not feeling it like the majority of women.

All women's bodies are different, with different needs and differing reactions to what goes on inside and outside of them. It's important to remember that all are unique and one woman's reaction may not be your reaction. However, if you're concerned about your ovulation, you can and should ask your medical provider for guidance and advice. Who knows, maybe next month you'll be hitting up your vibrator and your partner twice per day. It's possible.