When Does Rachel Leave 'The Bachelor'? The 'Bachelorette' Announcement This Early Is A First

"There are no rules" on The Bachelor — and that has never been more true than Monday night when Rachel was announced as The Bachelorette before she was even kicked off the show. Talk about a unique way to build momentum to a pretty surprising elimination (at least I didn't see it coming). With the big announcement out there, viewers are bound to ask "when does Rachel leave The Bachelor?" Well, now that we know she doesn't end up with Nick, it's a pretty valid question.

Throughout the season, Rachel seems to be a pretty consistent frontrunner. After all, the girl got the first impression rose, a wonderful one-on-one with Nick in New Orleans, and has stayed pretty drama-free throughout the season. (A huge plus, I don't care what you say.) So, the idea that someone who could very well win the season has just been named The Bachelorette, what happened? When did things go awry? And when does Rachel leave us!

If you're here, then I'm assuming you don't care about spoilers. If you do care about spoilers, then get out of here NOW. This is a spoiler zone, and could ruin the season. OK, are we over the potential of knowing what happens? Great. Here we go.

Mark Coffey/ABC

So, according to Bachelor know-it-all Reality Steve, Rachel makes it to the final three women on The Bachelor. Meaning, that is weeks away from the huge reveal on Monday night. Now, it's important to note, Reality Steve isn't always right. He's usually right, but not always. So, take this information with a grain of salt, but know that we may very well see Rachel for a couple of weeks. According to Steve, Rachel leaves after the overnight dates, with two other women standing (as it works with a final three narrowing down to a final two).

Will the season continue to be portrayed in that fashion? It would be hard to edit a Top 3 choice out of the show. So, chances are we will watch Nick and Rachel connect even more knowing that things aren't going to end well for them. (Then again, they may end well, but they don't end together.)