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When Will Hillary Clinton Speak Tomorrow?

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It is Wednesday morning and the election results are here — kind of. In a speech to Hillary Clinton's supporters at the Javits Center, Clinton campaign head John Podesta told everyone to go home and that Clinton would not speak about the results now. But when will Hillary Clinton speak tomorrow and when will she concede? It looks like Clinton could speak at any time given the election results.

Podesta stood up in front of the audience members at what was supposed to be Hillary Clinton's victory party — instead it was less of a victory and more of a quiet defeat. Yet, as Podesta stood in front of Clinton supporters he refused to admit defeat — and claimed Clinton would not either. "Everyone head home," Podesta told the audience. "You should get some sleep. We'll have more to say tomorrow. I want every person in this hall to know that your voices and your enthusiasm means so much to her and to Tim and to all of us. We are so proud of you and we are so proud of her. She's done an amazing job and she is not done yet."

Podesta's words were barely reassuring. Still, if Clinton is not done, then when will she speak?

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign manger John Podesta gestures before speaking during election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

It is more than likely that Clinton will speak Wednesday morning — once every last vote is counted — and properly concede to Donald Trump (something her supporters are likely dreading, as much as they, too, want to head to bed).

This is not the first time that a candidate has waited until the very early morning to speak. In the 2012 presidential election, Republican candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney did not speak until 1:30 in the morning — choosing to wait a little while until conceding to President Barack Obama. In the 2000 election, Democratic candidate Al Gore waited a little bit as well. However, they still spoke to the American people instead of choosing to go to bed.

"They're still counting votes and every vote should count," Podesta explained to the crowd of weary (and no doubt demoralized) Clinton supporters still waiting inside the Javits Center Wednesday morning.

It looks like Clinton just might wait a little longer than them. But it is yet unknown what time she will speak tomorrow, how she will do it, and where. For now, Americans everywhere will simply have to be content with a non-answer.