Which Linden's Cookies Have Been Recalled? Only The Best Kind

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It's a bad week for people with milk allergies. Just days after a recall of vegan mac and cheese that might not actually be vegan, some cookies are having the same problem. This is particularly troubling for kids (or adults who eat like kids), as they're two of the most important food groups. The good news for those concerned about which Linden's cookies have been recalled is that it's just two varieties, although they're certainly popular ones. Both the mini and full-sized chocolate chip cookies have been pulled from store shelves, due to undeclared milk in the chips. A request by Romper for comment was not immediately returned.

Linden's released the following statement through the FDA:

Linden Cookies, Inc. in Congers New York is recalling fully baked Linden’s Chocolate Chip Cookies because they contain undeclared milk. People who have an allergy to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume this product.
The Linden’s Chocolate Chip Cookies were distributed to wholesalers in Florida, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts.

The recall includes 2-ounce bags of Mini Chocolate Chippers with sell-by dates of Feb. 8, 2017 through March 28, 2017; 1.1-ounce bags of Mini Chocolate Chippers with sell-by dates of Feb. 8, 2017 through March 28, 2017; and 1.75 -ounce 3-packs of chocolate chip cookies with sell-by dates of Dec. 14, 2016 through Feb 01, 2017.

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Linden's statement noted that the company hasn't been notified of any illnesses associated with the product, and that the recall was initiated after it was notified by its bulk chocolate chip supplier that the chips contain undeclared milk, which could be life-threatening for those with a dairy allergy. Consumers who purchased the cookies in question are instructed to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund, and Linden's can be reached at 845-268-5050 if consumers have any questions.

According to the CDC, "food allergies are most prevalent in young children." A child suffering from an allergic reaction to food might complain that their mouth or tongue is tingling, itching, or burning, or that they feel like something is stuck in their throat. An allergic reaction could lead to anaphylaxis. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include "flush; tingling of the palms of the hands, soles of the feet or lips; light-headedness, and chest-tightness." The good news is that food allergies are often outgrown, so it might not be a life-long issue. But for now, those cookies are unfortunately off the table.