Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

Why Some Moms Might Want To Avoid Khloé's Pregnancy Post

By
Share

This year has felt like an extended game of Clue, or a very long Twin Peaks episode for the deluge of symbols, signs, and clouded motives around the various Kardashian pregnancies. Each week, fans' hopes would rise and fall with the latest coded Instagram or tweet from members of the famous clan. Today, though, Khloé Kardashian confirmed her rumored pregnancy with an Instagram post announcing the good news.

"My greatest dream realized!" she wrote on Instagram, "We are having a baby!" The picture was of a black-and-white belly photo; Khloé's hands (I assume) under boyfriend Tristan Thompson's hands, under an #iconic Calvin Klein sports bra. The post was exciting for those of us who have been keeping Kardashian pregnancy bingo cards this year, but bittersweet for those familiar with Khloé's fertility journey, and those who have been trying to conceive themselves.

For Khloé, the day was joyous. "I had been waiting and wondering but God had a plan all along. He knew what He was doing. I simply had to trust in Him and be patient. I still at times can't believe that our love created life!" She wrote in her Instagram caption, alluding to a late-breaking wish-granting by her deity of choice. Of course, we are all happy for Khloé, but it's important to also take this moment to consider the moms and women who would love to be moms whose fertility treatment didn't result in a Christmas Eve-Eve-Eve-Eve-Eve pregnancy announcement.

The implication, if accidental, is that God wanted Khloé to get pregnant, but not, by extension, other couples who have also been trying for a family. Right now, it honestly feels like every Kardashian is pregnant or about to have a baby (in truth, it's three of them), and that can leave a lot of women out in the cold.

Eighty percent of couples get pregnant within six months of trying to conceive, according to Baby Center, and women aged 30-33 have a 58 percent chance of getting pregnant after their first round of IVF, according to Hunter IVF. Finding yourself in the slim, unlucky slice of these statistics can feel isolating. And these odds are also influenced by money — women with plenty of monetary resources can afford more treatments, more rounds of IVF, and better health care. Privilege is very real when it comes to trying to conceive. And in terms of wealth and support, Khloe Kardashian is indeed privileged.

Interestingly, women have a higher chance of getting pregnant with a new boyfriend, per data from a study published in Evolutionary Psychological Science, because they are more aroused by a "novel" partner. Khloe Kardashian and Tristan Thompson were first spotted out in public in September 2016, just over a year ago, so their relationship is still relatively young.

Khloé has been outspoken about her desire to start a family and has alluded to fertility issues, which is a service of a sort for women in the murky world of TTC. Still, her joyous news is likely to register as a shockwave for other women who have not had her luck.

The psychological impact of fertility issues can be like a rollercoaster, says a Harvard report — half of the women at a fertility clinic said the experience had been the "most upsetting" experience of their lives. Fifteen percent of the men said the same.

Khloé's announcement is undoubtedly full of joy:

But for the women who don't have happy news to share with their friends and family this holiday season, it's worth sending a heart emoji or two to let them know they are cared for on this ~exciting~ day.

Check out Romper's new video series, Romper's Doula Diaries:

Watch full episodes of Romper's Doula Diaries on Facebook Watch.