If you've delivered a baby via C-section, then you know that the healing process from this surgery is no joke. But somewhere along the way, you may wonder about the permanent effects of this procedure on your body. For instance, will a C-section scar fade, and how can you help the healing process?

First, it's a good idea to remember how the scar got there in the first place. According to the Mayo Clinic, you receive a horizontal abdominal incision near your pubic hairline when you get a C-section. And then a baby is delivered through the incision. So even if you are not a fan of your scar, just keep in mind: a freaking baby came out of it. The scar is pretty cool, really.

That said, your scar will likely not be all that noticeable for too long. As noted in Parents, even if your scar initially has a red or purple hue, that will probably go away after about six months and become a small white line. Chances are, it won't even be that noticeable. If you're curious, and don't mind pictures that are very real, there is a gallery of (NSFW) caesarean scar pictures on Caesarean.org. Chances are, your scar will also fade almost completely in time.

V&P Photo Studio/Fotolia

There are some things you can try to help the fading process, but your mileage may vary with these techniques. As noted in New Health Guide, you can attempt to massage your incision scar after it has completely healed, which may reduce its appearance. You can move the scar tissue from side to side or go in circles, whatever feels right for you. There is also the wide world of scar reduction cream. But, again, it may not be the miracle you're hoping for. As the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Rajiv B. Gala said in Parents, "there have not been any good scientific studies demonstrating that any of the over-the-counter preparations are better than just proper wound care." However, there is probably no harm in trying out the creams if you're curious. In addition, Health Grades notes that you can try home remedies such as silicone gel, vitamin E, or even honey to help reduce the scar's appearance. Whatever treatment methods you decide to try out (or avoid altogether), remember that your scar is a mark of your motherhood and general bad*ssery.