Will My Vagina Be Dry During Postpartum Sex? Here's What You Can Expect

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Having a group of new moms to share stories and exchange ideas with is essential in the days after giving birth. When I was expecting my daughter, I relied heavily on the friends I made on Baby Center for friendship and advice. In your conversations with mom friends, you may have heard complaints about an issue no one wants to have after childbirth: vaginal dryness. Not only is this an uncomfortable condition, it may feel awkward to approach your doctor with the question, "Will my vagina be dry during postpartum sex?"

Although not all women experience vaginal dryness, it is an unfortunate fact for some. According to Healthline, a woman's estrogen levels will drop dramatically after childbirth. Estrogen is the hormone that increases the blood flow to your genitals, which helps boost your vaginal lubrication. With lower amounts of estrogen in your body you may not be able to produce as much natural moisture during sex as you did while pregnant or before.

Because breastfeeding also limits your body's production of estrogen, Parents magazine warned that nursing women may have an even harder time with vaginal dryness during sex. Additionally, an increase in prolactin, the hormone that boosts milk production, can also cause a new mom's libido to drop, according to Women's Day. As most women know, if you're not in the mood, not much will go on down below.

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The good news is that postpartum vaginal dryness is usually a temporary problem, and things should return to normal once you are no longer breastfeeding. In the mean time, up your foreplay game and consider using water-based lubricants during sex (petroleum-based lubes can ruin condoms and increase your risk of Irish twins).

You should also make sure to avoid using vaginal sprays, powders, and especially douches which can irritate your vaginal tissues, mess up your pH, and put you at risk of an infection. Healthline suggested talking to your doctor about using prescription estrogen creams or vaginal moisturizers if the lubricants and foreplay don't seem to help.