Sex

Portrait of a pregnant woman in an article about if it is OK to have sex doggy style pregnant.
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Can You Have Sex "Doggy Style" Pregnant? Here's The Deal

A midwife explains.

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Belly milestones during pregnancy are a thing: when you start to show, when you can see the baby move from the outside, when you can't see your feet, and when you can't have missionary sex anymore because that position is totally blocked. But what about other positions that don't get in the way of your bump? Can you have sex “doggy style” pregnant?

Sex can get really complicated the bigger your belly gets and the bigger you feel. In the beginning of my own pregnancy, it was a sexual free-for-all. Now, that is clearly not the case for everyone — some people are super sick and tired feeling. If you’re in that camp, that is totally OK. Rest and just say “no, thanks.” But, as for me, I wanted it all the time, and I had energy and flexibility for days. However, I remember that after about the 30-week mark, my knees and hips would creak if I tried go do a cowgirl position, thanks to all the relaxin hormones that make your joints extra stretchy during pregnancy. Missionary was straight out because my belly was too big, and several positions just didn't work for my husband and I to begin with. That basically left me with complicated, Kama Sutra positions and, you guessed it — doggy style.

Is it OK to have sex “doggy style” pregnant?

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“Yes, ‘doggie-style’ is OK during sex. Really, most sexual acts are safe, that is if they feel OK, and you haven't been told by your provider you should be on pelvic rest for specific situations,” explains Alexandra Bratschie, a certified nurse midwife with Spectrum Health West Michigan.

The bottom line (pun intended) is that it needs to work for you and your partner in a way that is pleasurable and comfortable. This may mean propping yourself up on pillows, having your partner do most of the heavy lifting, and it may mean that you have to take it to a new arena, like the sofa or a chair. “Sex can't hurt a baby, nor can an orgasm, so enjoy,” Bratschie says. “Or, if penetrative sex doesn't feel good for you, it's OK to say no, too!”

If your doctor has given you the green light to get it on, go ahead and experiment. If I may make a suggestion? Try all of the positions — I mean, for science.

Sources interviewed:

Alexandra Bratschie, a certified nurse midwife with Spectrum Health West Michigan

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