7 DIY 'Blue's Clues' Toys To Get Your Kid Excited About The New Season

I would be lying if I said news of a Blue's Clues revival didn't have me equally excited as my toddler. OK, let's be honest: She has no idea what Blue's Clues even is because the show hasn't aired new episodes since 2006 (a spinoff, Blue's Room, ended in 2007). But her mama does, chiefly because she grew up with two younger brothers who adored the show. (Secondarily because she secretly loved it too.) That's why I am pretty stoked about these DIY Blue's Clues toys to get your kid excited about the new season. Because nothing screams adult therapy like me forcing a children's television show on my 2-year-old.

But jokes aside, whether or not you can belt out all of the lines to the mail song like me (don't be jealous), or you simply love the idea of a show that helps your child navigate lessons like counting, identifying shapes, and the importance of going to the doctor, you are bound to find these activities useful when your kiddo wants some Blue's Clues fun in their lives.

Because I don't know about you, but I am determined to have a Handy Dandy Notebook in my hands — err, my daughter's — when Nickelodeon drops those 20 new episodes.

So, sit down in your thinking chair and, "Think, think, thiiiiiink ..." on these crafty how-tos and have some fun.

1"Mailtime, Mailtime, Mailtime!"

Precious Paws Family on YouTube

This DIY Blue's Clues Mailbox from Precious Paws Family requires a few simple items, including a tin mailbox (the user purchased this one at Oriental Trading), as well as felt, craft glue, and googly eyes. A few simple steps and your little one will be wailing, "Maaaaaail!"

2Your Own Handy Dandy Notebook

Logan Cooper/YouTube

There is an on point tutorial from Logan Cooper on YouTube, but it may be a bit time intensive for what you have in mind. (But, by all means, go for it if you have it in you!) However, this how-to from eHow is a bit more accessible. All you will need is a pencil, construction paper, scissors, tape, glue, and a crayon, and you'll have yourself a Handy Dandy Notebook in no time.

3DIY Pail & Shovel

Precious Paws Family on YouTube

Precious Paws Family is at it again, this time with her super cool Blue's Clues Pail and Shovel. According to the video, she purchased a plastic red and yellow pail and shovel from Party City for "I believe a dollar," then used a Sharpie and yellow and red felt to construct the popular characters' eyes and mouths.

4Make A 'Blue's Clues' House

Kidplay on YouTube

This Blue's Clues House will be a hit with school-aged kids who are ready for a hands-on craft. You'll need a ruler, construction paper, craft glue, pencil, scissors, tape, and a small, empty cardboard box. Have your child draw a "blueprint" of what they think the Blue's Clues house should look like. Once you do the bulk of the cutting and shaping with the cardboard, your kiddo can get to work on decorating and adding finishing touches.

5Craft A Mail Time Letter

Precious Paws Family on YouTube

OK, Precious Paws — whoa. They're back with all of their DIY extraordinaire and showing the rest of us up. Kidding. This Mail Time Letter is made from various colors of felt, Sharpie, craft glue, and clear sheet protectors.

6Create 'Blue's Clues' Characters

Kidplay on YouTube

Craft everything from a Handy Dandy Notebook to Tickety Tock to paper dolls of your child's favorite Blue's Clues characters by using everyday items like manila folders, a paper towel roll, card stock, scissors, and glue.

7When You Need To Go The Store Bought Route


If DIY just isn't your thing, then you may want to scoop up some Blue's Clues memorabilia from any one of a number of online resources. You'll find a Vintage 1998 Blue's Clues Mailbox ($50, Bonanza), Handy Dandy Notebooks — ones for both the Steve ($17, Etsy) and Joe ($17, Amazon) eras of the show — and, depending on how serious you are about this whole Blue's Clues thing, a real, live Thinking Chair (as seen above) for a measly $350 on eBay.

Check out Romper's new video series, Bearing The Motherload, where disagreeing parents from different sides of an issue sit down with a mediator and talk about how to support (and not judge) each other’s parenting perspectives. New episodes air Mondays on Facebook.