Courtesy of Hillary Savoie

Real Resolutions: Hillary S. On Hope & Health For Her Daughter In The New Year

January is a month filled with resolutions. On the first day of the month, as each of us wave goodbye to the previous year, we make way for all the things we plan to do once we have a fresh slate. We ask ourselves, What will I do better this year? How will I do better? What do I want to change about myself? About my behaviors? How can I improve? Resolutions made by women by and large get a bad rap. At face value, it's so easy to assume they'll all be the same: I'm going to lose weight!; I'm going to wake up earlier!; I'll travel! but if you take a look deeper, you'll notice just how raw and real resolutions made by women — especially moms — are. They're complex, multi-layered, and they're also incredibly honest.

Mothers aren't just making resolutions for themselves. They're constantly factoring in how the things they do and say and believe will shape and influence their children. Though moms are faced with these types of decisions day in and day out, the new year provides an opportunity to look at the year as a whole and to consider all the things they plan to change and improve on. For 2017, Romper spoke to 31 different moms all over the country in an effort to highlight just how diverse, bold, and exciting their resolutions are.

Courtesy of Hillary Savoie

Name: Hillary Savoie

Age: (Do I have to tell the truth?) 34

City and state: Troy, New York

Occupation: Writer, Founder, and Director, The Cute Syndrome Foundation

How old are your kids?: A 6-year-old daughter

What resolution do you think you're supposed to make? Why do you feel this way?: I feel like I'm always supposed to make a resolution to eat better. Also, since becoming a mom I feel as though I am supposed to resolve to be more present with my daughter. With both of these things, I never feel like there is such thing as doing them "enough."

What's your actual resolution this year, and why?: My resolution is to get to the boxing gym more — because last year I discovered that I really needed that outlet. I always thought my outlet was writing and, while it is, apparently I also need to punch things to feel healthier and happier in life. I am also resolving to try to worry less and have more fun!

I want my daughter to be as healthy and happy as possible. I hope for few hospital stays. I hope for no seizures. I hope that the school district will finally provide the nurse they are required to provide so that my daughter can attend Kindergarten twice a week for one hour.

What's the one resolution you won't make again?: I don't think I will ever resolve to lose weight again... that never turns out well.

What's one thing in your life you want to change but don't feel like you can?: My daughter's medical fragility... I work very hard to keep her healthy all day, every day. But life with a daughter who is so impacted by a genetic disorder is filled with terrifying unknowns. I run a foundation to work on the medical research that I hope will keep her, and children like her, safe. However, as I have supported more than one friend through the loss of their child this year, I know that no matter what I do, nothing is promised.

What's one thing you did or didn't do last year that you forgive yourself for?: You know what? I met all of my resolutions last year: I fired a gun. I learned how to land a decent punch. I flew somewhere to meet my dear friend just for fun. I went to Paris for four days and ate everything in site. I wrote more. I mixed and drank some amazing cocktails.

Do you tell your kids your resolution? Why or why not?: I told my daughter about some of my resolutions. I don't know if she understands... but especially for my traveling, which I've not been able to do much before because of how sick she's been, I wanted her to know that I was leaving to do something for me, but that I would be thrilled to come back to see her and tell her all about it.

What specifically do you want for your kids this year?: I want my daughter to be as healthy and happy as possible. I hope for few hospital stays. I hope for no seizures. I hope that the school district will finally provide the nurse they are required to provide so that my daughter can attend Kindergarten twice a week for one hour.