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Where To Get An "I Voted" Sticker, If You Didn't Get One At The Polls

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There's something about "I Voted" stickers that really sticks with people (pun intended). You can find them posted nearly everywhere on Election Day. And with early voting underway, people have already taken to social media to excitedly share pictures of their "I Voted" stickers online. Whether it's to express pride, encourage others, or even possibly shame others for opting out of voting (maybe a combination of all three?), "I Voted" stickers have proved to be popular items on all election days. So, whatever the reason, you may be excited about snagging one of these stickers after casting your vote. But what if they run out? What if someone before you snags all of them in a fit of rage and storms out before you can grab one? Don't worry: Here's where to get an "I Voted" sticker, in case you didn't get one at the polls. All hope is not lost.

There are a lot of "I Voted" sticker options online — some can be purchased and ordered through various sites, like Amazon, and with a quick Google search, you'll also find a number of companies that provide printable "I Voted" sticker templates, in which you can print "I Voted" stickers right from the comfort of your own home. So, if you had plans to take a selfie (outside of the voting booth... see: Justin Timberlake's gaffe here) with a nifty "I Voted" sticker, only to find that your polling place doesn't have one, you can still fulfill your Election Day goals.

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FERGUSON, MO - NOVEMBER 04: A pile of 'I Voted' stickers, which are handed out to residents after they vote, sit on a voting machine at a polling place on November 4, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. In last Aprils election only 1,484 of Ferguson's 12,096 registered voters cast ballots. Community leaders are hoping for a much higher turnout for this election. Following riots sparked by the August 9 shooting death of Michael Brown by Darren Wilson, a Ferguson police officer, residents of this majority black community on the outskirts of St. Louis have been forced to re-examine race relations in the region and take a more active role in the region's politics. Two-thirds of Fergusons population is African American yet five of its six city council members are white, as is its mayor, six of seven school board members and 50 of its 53 police officers. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

But while "I Voted" stickers, and all stickers really (who says adults ever stop enjoying stickers?), may be light-hearted fun for many, a 2012 article from The Atlantic made an interesting point about their potential societal impact. Derek Thompson of The Atlantic provided an insightful take on the popular use of "I Voted" stickers:

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For the 2016 presidential election, a number of celebrities have certainly used "I Voted" stickers to remind and encourage others to get out to the polls. Celebs like Timberlake, Jessica Biel, Zoë Kravitz, Kirstie Alley, Angela Bassett, and Kerry Washington have been outspoken about who they're supporting for the 2016 presidential election – and "I Voted" stickers have already started to make appearances on their social media accounts, prompting others, perhaps, to look into their local polling place, necessary Election Day documents, and much more.

Choosing who to vote for is always a personal decision. But it's good to know you also have plenty of choices for "I Voted" stickers as well — however you end up using them (for yourself or the rest of society's sake).