Why Your Vagina Is Sore After Sex, According To Science

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Sex with your partner can be incredibly fulfilling. It can be loving and long, rough and quick, and anything in between. Unfortunately, the euphoria can quickly fade when you notice your vagina becomes sore in the minutes after. You might wonder what exactly happens and why your vagina sore after sex? Luckily, there is an answer.

Sure, you probably already know that being dry during sex can make you uncomfortable, but it can actually be the reason for post-sex discomfort too. According to Women's Health, your vagina might be sore after sex because you were at least partially dry during intercourse. Typically, a long or extra energetic session in the sack can cause more friction if you are not well lubricated, which can lead to soreness or irritation after.

It's not just a lack of lubrication that can cause that post-sex pain. According to Woman's Day, pain during and after intercourse can be caused by trauma, a sexually transmitted disease, or various conditions (such as vaginismus, vulvar vestibulitis, vulvodynia, endometriosis, or other gynecological issues).

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"When sex hurts regularly, we call it dyspareunia, and it can result from a variety of conditions," OB-GYN Dr. Lissa Rankin told Woman's Day. "Too often, women fail to tell anyone when sex hurts. They assume it's always going to be that way and avoid getting help. I promise, we can help."

The bottom line is that persistent pain isn't normal, but it can be avoided. According to EmpowHER, if it's not a medical issue, avoiding soreness after sex comes down to making sure you are properly lubricated. Is your partner penetrating you too early? Many women need 15 to 20 minutes of foreplay before they are naturally lubricated enough for intercourse. Sometimesm however, you might still needed added lubrication, so using a bottled lubricant is another great option.

The other thing to keep in mind, according to the aforementioned Women's Health article, is that hormone changes and medications (like birth control pills or antihistamines) can also make you dry. This is another case where you might need to use a personal lubricant to treat dryness. You should also be careful to notice if the soreness after sex occurs after using certain hygiene products, condoms, or spermicides, which could also account for your irritation. If, however, your pain lasts longer than 24 hours and is accompanied by bleeding or unusual discharge, you should give your gynecologist a call.