Can we just be real for a second? Harry Potter fans are the best. There's no reason to argue. There's no reason to discuss any further. They're just simply, unequivocally, the best. Harry Potter fans have unique hopes for their children, they're up for re-reading the series so they can realize what they missed because J.K. Rowling is a genius, or just busy being genuinely amazing individuals who believe in the power of imagination.

But what happens when your kids start reading Harry Potter? We all know that literature, like all other media, can impact our children and the way they view their world. So how is reading arguably the most popular lit series of all time going to shape and mold our children into the adults they'll eventually become?

Well, it comes as no surprise that if adult Harry Potter fans are the best, children who read Harry Potter are going to grow up to be the best, too. From fostering a sense of creativity to celebrating diversity to realizing the importance of equality and building strong, meaningful relationships, kids who read Harry Potter are going to grow up to be the absolute best version of their adult selves. There are so many lessons that any reader of any age can take from J.K. Rowling's wizarding world, and those lessons will help kids turn into responsible, caring, self-loving adults that make the world, and those around them, better.

Here are 12 ways kids who read Harry Potter grow up to become the best adults, because reading is power and reading Harry Potter, means you're harnessing that power for good.

Their Imagination Never Dies


Harry Potter books either awakened their imagination, or fostered their imagination, but either way, a kid who reads Harry Potter isn't going to have any problem believing the unbelievable, or creating alternative universes where rules no longer apply. Just because they're "grownups" with "grown-up responsibilities," doesn't mean that their imagination has gone and died. They'll be more than happy to pretend, to dream, to think about the unbelievable and how it could become a reality.

They Love To Read

This will come as no surprise, but kids who read Harry Potter are, without a doubt, going to grow up to be avid readers. The wizarding world fostered a real love of literature, and it will be a lifetime affair.

They Believe In Magic


They're More Inclusive Of Others

Harry Potter is all about inclusion, and so is the world J.K. Rowling gave him to live in. Every wizard, every witch, every goblin, and every giant is different, and it is their differences that inevitably helps good defeat evil. If it wasn't for everyone's unique abilities and personalities, Harry and his friends wouldn't have been triumphant over He Who Shall Not Be Named. That lesson won't be lost on a Harry Potter fan, and as adults (and even kids) they'll be quick to celebrate people's differences and be inclusive of everyone.

They Know Life Is Complicated, And They're OK With It


The storyline of Professor Snape is proof that life is complicated, nothing is simply "black" or "white" and we can't take things at face value. A kid who grows up reading Harry Potter, is going to grow up knowing that things aren't always fair, the story doesn't always end exactly how you wanted it to, but that is OK. We can celebrate defeats and heartache, because they are part of every story. A necessary part of every story.

They're Not Ashamed To Like What They Like

Harry Potter fans are proud and unashamed. They're not going to hide their affinity for The Wizarding World Of Harry Potter, and they're not going to be ashamed about the fact that they know every spell in the book. This Harry Potter pride will quickly turn into self-pride, and as a grownup, Harry Potter fans aren't going to be afraid to love themselves for who they are.

They're Wonderfully Childlike


There's no such thing as a "growing up" to a young Harry Potter fan. Even when they move out and start paying bills, they'll still be quick to embrace their childlike qualities. They won't be ashamed when they get excited about a movie or an adult coloring book or something that society tells them is "for kids," because hey, age is just a number.

They're Never Quick To Judge

They learned not to judge Professor Snape, and they'll learn not to judge people in general. The only way you can really know someone, is to take the time to get to know them. They will allow themselves to be vulnerable with others, so they can foster a true connection, instead of looking at someone and making sweeping assumptions about who they are as an individual. Even the Draco Malfoys among us have redeeming qualities.

They're Not Afraid Of Their Feelings


They're not going to hide their feelings or emotions. Reading a series like Harry Potter was emotional, to say the least, and the stories and plots that unfolded made it very easy to get in touch with all the feelings. A kid who reads Harry Potter is going to realize that crying doesn't mean you're weak, and caring about others doesn't mean you're not strong.

They Believe In Equality

"Pure-blood" wizards weren't better than others, and there was absolutely nothing wrong with having a muggle parent or two. Hermione was just as smart and capable as the boys (sometimes, even more so) and even the seemingly timid, like Neville, could evoke great change. Harry Potter teaches equality, and a kid who reads about it is going to grow up practicing it.

They Love And Encourage Creativity


A kid who grows up reading the Harry Potter books is going to grow up believing in the power of creativity. Everything that they love about the wizarding world came from one woman's brain, and if that one woman didn't take the time to foster her creativity, Harry Potter wouldn't exist. A Harry Potter fan is going to realize that creativity is worth investing in, with time and money and everything in between.

They Work Well With Others

Let's face it: Hermione, Ron, and Harry? Original #SquadGoals. A Harry Potter fan knows that you're only as good as the people you surround yourself with, and they're going to realize that you're far more powerful when you're in a group, while still realizing their own unique and personal potential.