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Kensington Palace Has Issued A Rare Statement About An Article On Kate Middleton

Just when you thought the whole Cambridge vs. Sussex feuding thing was over, another article about the two royal families — two women in particular — has people talking once again. Even Kensington Palace, which responded to the article about Kate Middleton that touched on a supposed rift between her and her sister-in-law Meghan Markle.

The article in question, published in Tatler on May 25, was actually highly favorable of the duchess and even referred to Middleton as "Catherine The Great," but Kensington Palace still apparently thought it contained a "swathe of inaccuracies and false misrepresentations."

The Tatler article reported behind-the-scenes information from unnamed "sources," who claimed to know a thing or two about a thing or two. For instance, supposedly confirming a certain coldness between Middleton and her sister-in-law. A "friend" told Tatler that the mother of three never "pulled Meghan under her wing and said, 'I’ll show you the ropes,'" allegedly, adding that a rift grew between Prince William and his brother Prince Harry when he and Markle got engaged in 2017.

Another "friend" claimed to confirm a rumor about an issue between the sisters-in-law on Markle's wedding day over children's tights, of all things. "Then there was an incident at the wedding rehearsal. It was a hot day and apparently there was a row over whether the bridesmaids should wear tights or not," the source told Tatler. "Kate, following protocol, felt that they should. Meghan didn’t want them to."

Kensington Palace normally stays silent on rumors and media coverage about the royal family, but this article apparently caught their attention. In a statement about the Tatler article provided to several media outlets, including Entertainment Tonight, the palace said: "This story contains a swathe of inaccuracies and false misrepresentations which were not put to Kensington Palace prior to publication."

In a statement to Romper, Tatler said it stands by the article and the reporting. "Tatler's Editor-in-Chief Richard Dennen stands behind the reporting of Anna Pasternak and her sources," the statement read. "Kensington Palace knew we were running the 'Catherine the Great' cover months ago and we asked them to work together on it. The fact they are denying they ever knew is categorically false."

Of course, the palace did not specify which elements of the article considered "a swathe of inaccuracies." Certainly the praise Middleton received for her work efforts during the coronavirus pandemic would probably not be an issue, nor much of the article where she is referred to as a very involved mother to Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis. One mother at Thomas's Battersea School in London, where both Prince George and Princess Charlotte are students, was quoted as saying, "She does the drop-off herself, comes to coffee mornings and even queues to get her own coffee after drop-off, like the other mothers."

As for the pervasive rumors about Middleton and Markle, perhaps Kensington Palace has heard quite enough conjecture on that front.