Pre-Cut Melon Sold In Supermarkets Has Been Recalled Over Salmonella Concerns, Here's What You Need To Know

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Dozens of people in at least a dozen states have contracted salmonella poisoning recently, and it seems there is a connection. A new report released by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday said that a link has been found with a certain convenience product found at major supermarkets and the recent outbreak. Pre-cut melon sold in supermarkets has been recalled over salmonella concerns, and you're going to want to check your fridge.

On Friday the Food and Drug Association (FDA) as well as the CDC announced a massive voluntary recall of pre-packaged cut melon products in major supermarkets like Target, Wal-Mart, Trader Joe's Kroger, and Whole Foods in 12 states. This recall includes pre-cut honeydew melon, watermelon, cantaloupe, and fruit medley products that were packaged by Caito Foods in Indianapolis, Indiana. Health officials are warning people who live in North Carolina, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin to discard any pre-cut melon products they might have in their fridge, as there is a strong likelihood they could be contaminated with salmonella poisoning, as per NBC New York.

Romper reached out to Caito Foods for comment and is waiting for a reply.

As of Friday the FDA was investigating 93 potential cases of salmonella poisoning in relation to Caito Foods' cut melon products, as per CNN, 23 of which resulted in hospitalization. Fortunately no deaths have yet been reported. If you're concerned that you might have possibly purchased contaminated cut melon, your best bet is to throw it out. The products in question were sold in clear, plastic clam shell containers. Consumers can check the complete list with brand, product name, and retailers carrying the recalled products here.

Most people who have contracted salmonella poisoning will experience symptoms within 12 to 72 hours after exposure, as per the CDC. Those symptoms can include diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps and can last four to seven days. While most people can recover without treatment, it can be much more severe for young children, elderly people, and those with weakened immune systems. For those more vulnerable people salmonella poisoning can result in hospitalization and can even be fatal. The CDC reported that salmonella poisoning is responsible for one million food-related deaths every year.

Hopefully the voluntary recall will prevent any further illnesses from salmonella poisoning. It certainly appears as though Caito Foods is trying to contain the issue, as the FDA told Reuters:

Reports of illnesses linked to these products are under investigation, and Caito Foods is voluntarily recalling the products out of an abundance of caution.

Perhaps the main issue at hand is simply ensuring customers are aware of the recall and don't eat any more of the potentially contaminated products. If you do think you've contracted salmonella poisoning already, the CDC recommends contacting your medical health professional immediately to seek treatment. Otherwise... let's all err on the side of caution and get rid of those pre-cut melons, shall we?