Romper

Having Kids Helped Me Embrace My Own Sexuality

Courtesy of Margaret Jacobsen

My children's first interactions around sex and sexuality are actually taking place in our home right now. I've worked hard to establish where we live as a safe place for them to grow, make mistakes and learn from them, and to inquire about life. It's why I made the choice early on in their lives to make sure that they learned about sex from me and from their dad, and that in teaching them about sex, we taught our kids to be sex positive. As much as people warned me that the conversation around sex is awkward between a parent and child, I didn't let the fear of being uncomfortable keep me from taking about sex with my 3- and 2-year-old children.

I'm sure that talking to a 3 year old and a 2 year old about sex sounds like it's a bit young, but I feel like that's because we're so used to framing the sex conversation around the "birds and the bees" conversation. When I was growing up I never had that conversation with my parents and had to frame my own ideals about sex and sexuality through experience and age. I didn't want that for my children, though. So I felt that a toddler age was actually a wonderful time to start talking to them about how to love their bodies and how to appreciate them. I felt like the intro into sex isn't about diving head first into questions like "where does the penis go?" and "what is the purpose of the vagina?" I wanted to give my kids a foundation for understanding and respecting their bodies before I ever taught them how about the intimacy shared between two people.

Courtesy of Margaret Jacobsen

More than anything, I wanted my kids to understand as soon as possible how to love themselves, to understand consent, and to respect others' bodies. I believe that sex positivity isn't just about the act of having sex, it's also about learning that the experience starts with you and will eventually (if you choose) include others.

By the time I was 18, I had disassociated myself from my body because of how my parents talked about it. now I had the chance to do things differently.

My upbringing kept me from understanding what sex was. My parents sex hidden, far above my reach. I was told we'd open that box when I was old enough, but only when I was was getting close to marriage. I found this strange — even at 10 years old. I would look sex up in the dictionary and in the encyclopedia. I often wondered what sex was and what was so special about it — why was it something only adults could understand? I'd hear my friends talk about boobs, about liking boys, and wonder if I'd ever feel comfortable enough to be naked around another person I liked. At the time, the thought horrified me.

I was uncomfortable with my body. I didn't understand what was happening to it, or why I was suddenly getting hair under my armpits and on my vagina. My parents were constantly telling me to "be modest," and I felt so much pressure and responsibility to look and behave and act a certain way. By the time I was 18, I had disassociated myself from my body because of how my parents talked about it. now I had the chance to do things differently.

Courtesy of Margaret Jacobsen

When I was 18, I was in love and I had sex for the first time. It was amazing, and I had no idea why I'd been so afraid and so ashamed. I was raised Christian and was taught to believe that sex before marriage was shameful. But after having sex for the first time, I didn't want any forgiveness. I simply wanted to keep having sex, without feeling guilty because of it. After I'd gotten married to my then-husband and had two kids, I looked back on my own sexual experiences and realized that I didn't want my children gaining their sex education from the world around them without some input from me. I didn't want them feel ashamed of the fact that they liked having sex or pleasuring their bodies. I wanted my kids to know that they could always come and talk to me, that I would always support them.

I tell them dressing my body in things that make me feel confident makes me feel empowered, as if my body hold some kind of magic. They love that. So do I.  

So I started to talk to them about celebrating their bodies when they were young. And because of that, I had deeper conversations with myself surrounding my own sex positivity. I had some sexual trauma in my past, which has always made it a bit difficult for me to grapple with wanting to be sexual and carving out safe spaces to practice having sex. I made changes in my personal life: I was more vocal with myself about my needs and wants, then with partners. It helped me shape the conversations I'd have with my children about how they can and should voice what they want, not with sex because that's still a ways off, but when interacting with others. I wanted them to learn and understand the power of their own voices. I taught them to say, "No, that's not something I would enjoy," or "I would really like if we did this" in their everyday lives, knowing that these lessons will help them in their sexuality later on. We've focused on how important it is for them to speak up for themselves and to advocate for themselves.

Courtesy of Margaret Jacobsen

Another thing we do in our house is walk around naked. I used to shy away from showing parts of my body, like my stomach or my thighs. I have stretch marks and cellulite — both things I've been told aren't "sexy." My kids, however, could care less about whether or not my body is sexy enough, because they just like how soft my body is. It's soft for cuddling and for hugging, two things that are very important to them. My kids move so confidently with their bodies, both with clothes on and with clothes off. My daughter's favorite thing is to stand in front of the mirror and compliment herself. She's actually inspired me to do the same. I've taken up the practice. They've seen me in some of my lingerie, and tell me it's beautiful. They don't know that lingerie is "just for sex" or that it's something I should feel wary of other people seeing. Instead, I tell them dressing my body in things that make me feel confident makes me feel empowered, as if my body hold some kind of magic. They love that. So do I.  

I watch them be confident in their bodies. I watch them say "no" strongly to each other, and to others, and most importantly, I watch them hear and respect each other.

My kids are 6 and 7 years old now, and we've talked about what sex is. The conversation has changed as they've grown up. They understand that sex is a beautiful act, one that mostly happens when people are naked. They don't really care to know more yet, but I watch them be confident in their bodies. I watch them say "no" strongly to each other, and to others, and most importantly, I watch them hear and respect each other. As a person who is non-monogamous, I've shown them that sex and love are not limited to one person. It can be, but it doesn't have to be. In turn, my children have taught me to respect and be proud of my body. They think it is magic — and I agree.

Lately, the children have been exploring their bodies, which I've told them is fine, but it's reserved for their alone time. I'm trying to make sure that when we talk about our bodies and about sex that we do so in an uplifting, positive way. I don't want my children to ever question or feel any shame around their bodies or their wants. I want to equip them with the right knowledge so that they'll be able to enjoy. Most of all, I want them to be happy.